Northern Ireland Assembly Election: A "watershed" in United Kingdom relations?

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Northern Ireland Assembly Election: A "watershed" in United Kingdom relations?

What does the future of Northern Ireland look like?

The Northern Ireland Assembly election, held on the 2nd of March, mobilised the highest number of voters since 1998 and left the Democratic Unionist Party with 28 seats, and Sinn Féin narrowly behind with 27. The Social Democratic and Labour Party now hold 12 seats and the Ulster Unionist Party follow with 10. According to the power sharing agreement in the North, the resignation of Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness over the Renewable Heat Incentive, triggered an Assembly election. The main parties framed the election as a binary choice, between those who stand with Westminster and those who stand against it. In the aftermath of this "watershed" election, with the deadline for the parties reaching a deal being March 27, there is little space for a power sharing agreement to be reached. Following the election results, what did these parties really stand for, and what do the results mean for the possibility of a power sharing agreement and the future of Northern Ireland’s relationship with Westminster?

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