An issue of ethics: Indonesia's plans to castrate convicted paedophiles

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An issue of ethics: Indonesia's plans to castrate convicted paedophiles

Indonesia's recent legislation on castrating convicted paedophiles has sparked outrage in the human rights community.

Earlier this month, the Indonesian Parliament voted in favour of the new policy of chemical castration to be inflicted upon convicted paedophiles. Chemical castration involves the use of drugs to reduce sex drive and sexual desire. This controversial approach, championed by President Joko Widodo, has been condemned by many human rights activists as well as the Indonesian Doctors Association. President Widodo has said that Indonesia respects human rights, but there can be no middle ground when it comes to the punishment of such serious sex crimes. Can this authorisation of chemical castration be seen as ineffective as well as a violation of human rights and medical ethics?

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